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November 2021
October 2021
July 2021
May 2021
Tue 25 May 2021, 20:15 U
|
Concert Hall Amsterdam
Tears of a Mother / Stabat Mater, G.B. Pergolesi
CANCELLED

The tears of a mother at the mercy of her dying child, that heartbreaking fact is the focus of this program by PRJCT Amsterdam of countertenor Maarten Engeltjes and writer P.F. Thomése. You will hear, among others, the Stabat mater by Pergolesi.

Pergolesi's Stabat Mater
The Stabat mater contemplates the suffering and death of Jesus through the tearful eyes of his mother Mary. Pergolesi probably wrote the work at the behest of the Neapolitan Duke of Maddalona, with whom he was employed until his very early death (he died at the age of 26) in 1736. The text dates from the thirteenth century and had previously been set to music by Alessandro Scarlatti.

PRJCT Amsterdam & P.F. Thomése
Some programs arise from a seemingly random sequence of events. It was Herman van Veen's introduction to a stabat mater that struck countertenor Maarten Engeltjes. 'What are the names of the parents of a child who has died,' van Veen wondered. 'Those words breathed life into the abstract Latin with Pergolesi.' Later, Engeltjes came into contact with writer P.F. Thomése. In the novel Shadow Child Thomése writes about the miracle of the birth and the sudden death of a child: his daughter Isa. 'Pergolesi's music has a beauty that reconciles man with the imperfection of life. Shadow child also possesses that core,' says Thomése. Thus was born the idea of allowing present and past to dialogue with each other in the program The Tears of a Mother.

Program
Vivaldi - Nulla in mundo pax sincera, RV 630
Vivaldi - Nisi Dominus in g, RV 608
Pergolesi - Stabat mater in F (interwoven with texts from "Shadow Child" by P. F. Thomése)

Sat 22 May 2021, 20:15 U
|
Concertgebouw Amsterdam, Musis Arnhem
Tears of a Mother / Stabat Mater, G.B. Pergolesi
CANCELLED

The tears of a mother at the mercy of her dying child, that heartbreaking fact is the focus of this program by PRJCT Amsterdam of countertenor Maarten Engeltjes and writer P.F. Thomése. You will hear, among others, the Stabat mater by Pergolesi.

Pergolesi's Stabat Mater
The Stabat mater contemplates the suffering and death of Jesus through the tearful eyes of his mother Mary. Pergolesi probably wrote the work at the behest of the Neapolitan Duke of Maddalona, with whom he was employed until his very early death (he died at the age of 26) in 1736. The text dates from the thirteenth century and had previously been set to music by Alessandro Scarlatti.

PRJCT Amsterdam & P.F. Thomése
Some programs arise from a seemingly random sequence of events. It was Herman van Veen's introduction to a stabat mater that struck countertenor Maarten Engeltjes. 'What are the names of the parents of a child who has died,' van Veen wondered. 'Those words breathed life into the abstract Latin with Pergolesi.' Later, Engeltjes came into contact with writer P.F. Thomése. In the novel Shadow Child Thomése writes about the miracle of the birth and the sudden death of a child: his daughter Isa. 'Pergolesi's music has a beauty that reconciles man with the imperfection of life. Shadow child also possesses that core,' says Thomése. Thus was born the idea of allowing present and past to dialogue with each other in the program The Tears of a Mother.

Program
Vivaldi - Nulla in mundo pax sincera, RV 630
Vivaldi - Nisi Dominus in g, RV 608
Pergolesi - Stabat mater in F (interwoven with texts from "Shadow Child" by P. F. Thomése)

January 2020
November 2019
October 2019
Sun 13 October 2019, 14:15 U
|
Muziekgebouw Amsterdam
Nicht mehr hier
Music by J.S. Bach & D. Buxtehude

'Schlummert ein, ihr matten Augen'... the beauty of this aria cannot be described with a pen. And this is true of much of Bach's music, especially when death is the theme, as in the cantatas 'Ich habe genug' and 'Vergnügte Ruh'. That death was an exceptionally inspiring subject for Bach is undeniable.

In his own life, death was omnipresent. Bach was orphaned as a small boy, he lost his first wife at an early age (she was already buried when he returned home from a trip), and no fewer than nine of his children died before the age of ten. So much suffering - it is almost impossible to imagine. It is obvious that by setting texts such as 'Ich freue mich auf meinen Tod' (BWV 82) or 'Mir ekelt mehr zu leben' (BWV 170) to music, Bach was trying to give death a place, perhaps even to reconcile himself to it. This positive approach to death is all the more striking because Lutheranism, to which Bach is so closely related in many respects, sees death precisely as the greatest enemy of all, as that which Christ had to overcome. During the Baroque period, a time without antibiotics and without proper hygiene, death was omnipresent; infant mortality was the rule rather than the exception. In a time of such powerlessness in the face of illness and suffering, was there perhaps more acceptance? For example, in his chilling "Lament," Buxtehude thanks his father for all he taught him and wishes him a gentle rest. In addition to the immense sadness that emanates from the work, a certain meditative resignation is also palpable.

Sat 12 October 2019, 20:15 U
|
Philharmonie - Haarlem
Nicht mehr hier
Music by J.S. Bach & D. Buxtehude

'Schlummert ein, ihr matten Augen'... the beauty of this aria cannot be described with a pen. And this is true of much of Bach's music, especially when death is the theme, as in the cantatas 'Ich habe genug' and 'Vergnügte Ruh'. That death was an exceptionally inspiring subject for Bach is undeniable.

In his own life, death was omnipresent. Bach was orphaned as a small boy, he lost his first wife at an early age (she was already buried when he returned home from a trip), and no fewer than nine of his children died before the age of ten. So much suffering - it is almost impossible to imagine. It is obvious that by setting texts such as 'Ich freue mich auf meinen Tod' (BWV 82) or 'Mir ekelt mehr zu leben' (BWV 170) to music, Bach was trying to give death a place, perhaps even to reconcile himself to it. This positive approach to death is all the more striking because Lutheranism, to which Bach is so closely related in many respects, sees death precisely as the greatest enemy of all, as that which Christ had to overcome. During the Baroque period, a time without antibiotics and without proper hygiene, death was omnipresent; infant mortality was the rule rather than the exception. In a time of such powerlessness in the face of illness and suffering, was there perhaps more acceptance? For example, in his chilling "Lament," Buxtehude thanks his father for all he taught him and wishes him a gentle rest. In addition to the immense sadness that emanates from the work, a certain meditative resignation is also palpable.

Fri 11 Oct 2019, 20:00 U
|
Musis Arnhem
Nicht mehr hier
Music by J.S. Bach & D. Buxtehude

'Schlummert ein, ihr matten Augen'... the beauty of this aria cannot be described with a pen. And this is true of much of Bach's music, especially when death is the theme, as in the cantatas 'Ich habe genug' and 'Vergnügte Ruh'. That death was an exceptionally inspiring subject for Bach is undeniable.

In his own life, death was omnipresent. Bach was orphaned as a small boy, he lost his first wife at an early age (she was already buried when he returned home from a trip), and no fewer than nine of his children died before the age of ten. So much suffering - it is almost impossible to imagine. It is obvious that by setting texts such as 'Ich freue mich auf meinen Tod' (BWV 82) or 'Mir ekelt mehr zu leben' (BWV 170) to music, Bach was trying to give death a place, perhaps even to reconcile himself to it. This positive approach to death is all the more striking because Lutheranism, to which Bach is so closely related in many respects, sees death precisely as the greatest enemy of all, as that which Christ had to overcome. During the Baroque period, a time without antibiotics and without proper hygiene, death was omnipresent; infant mortality was the rule rather than the exception. In a time of such powerlessness in the face of illness and suffering, was there perhaps more acceptance? For example, in his chilling "Lament," Buxtehude thanks his father for all he taught him and wishes him a gentle rest. In addition to the immense sadness that emanates from the work, a certain meditative resignation is also palpable.

Thu October 10, 2019, 8:30 pm
|
Concert Hall - Tilburg
Nicht mehr hier
Music by J.S. Bach & D. Buxtehude

'Schlummert ein, ihr matten Augen'... the beauty of this aria cannot be described with a pen. And this is true of much of Bach's music, especially when death is the theme, as in the cantatas 'Ich habe genug' and 'Vergnügte Ruh'. That death was an exceptionally inspiring subject for Bach is undeniable.

In his own life, death was omnipresent. Bach was orphaned as a small boy, he lost his first wife at an early age (she was already buried when he returned home from a trip), and no fewer than nine of his children died before the age of ten. So much suffering - it is almost impossible to imagine. It is obvious that by setting texts such as 'Ich freue mich auf meinen Tod' (BWV 82) or 'Mir ekelt mehr zu leben' (BWV 170) to music, Bach was trying to give death a place, perhaps even to reconcile himself to it. This positive approach to death is all the more striking because Lutheranism, to which Bach is so closely related in many respects, sees death precisely as the greatest enemy of all, as that which Christ had to overcome. During the Baroque period, a time without antibiotics and without proper hygiene, death was omnipresent; infant mortality was the rule rather than the exception. In a time of such powerlessness in the face of illness and suffering, was there perhaps more acceptance? For example, in his chilling "Lament," Buxtehude thanks his father for all he taught him and wishes him a gentle rest. In addition to the immense sadness that emanates from the work, a certain meditative resignation is also palpable.

March 2019
January 2019
November 2018
July 2018
November 2017
Sun 26 November 2017, 14:15 U
|
Chapelle De La Trninté - Lyon
Stabat Mater

The theme of the Stabat Mater project is fate, death, especially the death of a child - and especially the loss of a child as experienced by the parents. The program begins with two pieces by Antonio Vivaldi, Nulla in mundo pax and Nisi dominus (with the moving Cum dederit) about fate, doom and destiny. This is followed by the well-known and beloved Stabat Mater (1736) by Giovanni Batista Pergolesi (1710-1736) in which Mary weeps at the foot of the cross for her son Jesus: The deeply grieved Mother | Stood weeping by the cross | While her Son hung there.

As an introduction to the second part of the concert, P.F. Thomése, author of the book Schaduwkind (Shadow Child; 2003) about the death of his own little daughter, reads several passages from it. The combination of eighteenth-century music and modern literature underscores the timelessness of the theme. It can also contribute to making Baroque music accessible to an audience that is more familiar with text and literature than with early music.

Sat November 25, 2017, 8:15 PM
|
Salle Gaveau - Paris
Stabat Mater

The theme of the Stabat Mater project is fate, death, especially the death of a child - and especially the loss of a child as experienced by the parents. The program begins with two pieces by Antonio Vivaldi, Nulla in mundo pax and Nisi dominus (with the moving Cum dederit) about fate, doom and destiny. This is followed by the well-known and beloved Stabat Mater (1736) by Giovanni Batista Pergolesi (1710-1736) in which Mary weeps at the foot of the cross for her son Jesus: The deeply grieved Mother | Stood weeping by the cross | While her Son hung there.

As an introduction to the second part of the concert, P.F. Thomése, author of the book Schaduwkind (Shadow Child; 2003) about the death of his own little daughter, reads several passages from it. The combination of eighteenth-century music and modern literature underscores the timelessness of the theme. It can also contribute to making Baroque music accessible to an audience that is more familiar with text and literature than with early music.

October 2017
Sun 1 October 2017, 14:15 U
|
Muziekgebouw Amsterdam
Stabat Mater

The theme of the Stabat Mater project is fate, death, especially the death of a child - and especially the loss of a child as experienced by the parents. The program begins with two pieces by Antonio Vivaldi, Nulla in mundo pax and Nisi dominus (with the moving Cum dederit) about fate, doom and destiny. This is followed by the well-known and beloved Stabat Mater (1736) by Giovanni Batista Pergolesi (1710-1736) in which Mary weeps at the foot of the cross for her son Jesus: The deeply grieved Mother | Stood weeping by the cross | While her Son hung there.

As an introduction to the second part of the concert, P.F. Thomése, author of the book Schaduwkind (Shadow Child; 2003) about the death of his own little daughter, reads several passages from it. The combination of eighteenth-century music and modern literature underscores the timelessness of the theme. It can also contribute to making Baroque music accessible to an audience that is more familiar with text and literature than with early music.

September 2017
Sat 30 September 2017, 20:15 U
|
Philharmonie - Haarlem
Stabat Mater

The theme of the Stabat Mater project is fate, death, especially the death of a child - and especially the loss of a child as experienced by the parents. The program begins with two pieces by Antonio Vivaldi, Nulla in mundo pax and Nisi dominus (with the moving Cum dederit) about fate, doom and destiny. This is followed by the well-known and beloved Stabat Mater (1736) by Giovanni Batista Pergolesi (1710-1736) in which Mary weeps at the foot of the cross for her son Jesus: The deeply grieved Mother | Stood weeping by the cross | While her Son hung there.

As an introduction to the second part of the concert, P.F. Thomése, author of the book Schaduwkind (Shadow Child; 2003) about the death of his own little daughter, reads several passages from it. The combination of eighteenth-century music and modern literature underscores the timelessness of the theme. It can also contribute to making Baroque music accessible to an audience that is more familiar with text and literature than with early music.

Fri September 29, 2017, 8:15 pm
|
Concert Hall - Tilburg
Stabat Mater

The theme of the Stabat Mater project is fate, death, especially the death of a child - and especially the loss of a child as experienced by the parents. The program begins with two pieces by Antonio Vivaldi, Nulla in mundo pax and Nisi dominus (with the moving Cum dederit) about fate, doom and destiny. This is followed by the well-known and beloved Stabat Mater (1736) by Giovanni Batista Pergolesi (1710-1736) in which Mary weeps at the foot of the cross for her son Jesus: The deeply grieved Mother | Stood weeping by the cross | While her Son hung there.

As an introduction to the second part of the concert, P.F. Thomése, author of the book Schaduwkind (Shadow Child; 2003) about the death of his own little daughter, reads several passages from it. The combination of eighteenth-century music and modern literature underscores the timelessness of the theme. It can also contribute to making Baroque music accessible to an audience that is more familiar with text and literature than with early music.

Sat 2 September 2017, 20:15 U
|
St John's Basilica - Laren
Stabat Mater

The theme of the Stabat Mater project is fate, death, especially the death of a child - and especially the loss of a child as experienced by the parents. The program begins with two pieces by Antonio Vivaldi, Nulla in mundo pax and Nisi dominus (with the moving Cum dederit) about fate, doom and destiny. This is followed by the well-known and beloved Stabat Mater (1736) by Giovanni Batista Pergolesi (1710-1736) in which Mary weeps at the foot of the cross for her son Jesus: The deeply grieved Mother | Stood weeping by the cross | While her Son hung there.

As an introduction to the second part of the concert, P.F. Thomése, author of the book Schaduwkind (Shadow Child; 2003) about the death of his own little daughter, reads several passages from it. The combination of eighteenth-century music and modern literature underscores the timelessness of the theme. It can also contribute to making Baroque music accessible to an audience that is more familiar with text and literature than with early music.